What a Marine Taught Me About Jesus

About a month ago, I was asked to be one of the contributors for Kirk Cameron’s new website, The Courage. I am deeply honored to be working with his team to spread hope and strength to larger audience of Christians! Please take some time today to sign up for email updates and follow the site on Facebook and Twitter. They have some amazing articles from a broad range of talented contributors. In addition to working with The Courage, I’ll still be posting regularly here at Elihu’s Corner to encourage you on your walk with the Lord and help you draw closer to Him.

My first article went live today, and I wanted to share it with all of you, my very dear readers, who have been such an encouragement to me over the past two years since I started blogging.

May you be encouraged today to live, as Jesus lived, saying, “My life for yours.”


What a Marine Taught Me About Jesus

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A few days ago, I found myself sitting in a quiet waiting room with my kids. While they were playing with the toy set in the room, my eyes fell upon a small picture of a Marine. The young man sat in his dress uniform, his face giving just a hint of a steely smile. His knees and lower legs were exposed, revealing two prosthetic legs. Beneath his picture, the caption read, “Regrets? No, Mr. President, none that I can think of.”

This Marine had two well-functioning limbs taken from his body in the course of fighting in the war. Can you imagine living without the legs you were born with? Instead of sulking in bitterness or succumbing to depression, he expresses no regrets in such a loss.

People like that Marine—military personnel, law enforcement officers, first responders—run toward the danger everyone else is trying to escape. They risk death or injury to help those who cannot help themselves….

(Read the rest of this article here at The Courage)

Three mechanics of monetary giving

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For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evils. It is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pangs…

As for the rich in this present age, charge them not to be haughty, nor to set their hopes on the uncertainty of riches, but on God, who richly provides us with everything to enjoy. They are to do good, to be rich in good works, to be generous and ready to share, thus storing up treasure for themselves as a good foundation for the future, so that they may take hold of that which is truly life.

1 Timothy 6.10, 17-19, ESV

Money is not the root of all evil, but the love of money certainly is!

Money tends to bring out the worst side of people, and Christians are not immune. Currency is necessary to spread the gospel and is not, in and of itself, evil. Trouble arises when people selfishly withhold their money, give to be praised by others, or give in order to grow their prominence and influence within the church.

How much one gives to the church or to anyone in need is not a matter of quantity, but the quality of the heart with which it was given. We must all carefully examine our own hearts and minds, knowing that God sees what nobody else can.

When I was a young adult, I didn’t how much I should give or how to work it in to my life effectively. I gave rather sporadically as my limited funds allowed and was rather ashamed of my inconsistent giving. My intention was always to give more, but then some unexpected expense would arise and I’d have to hold back. This is what I have learned in the intervening years: effective giving happens through intentional planning rather than good intentions.

So, how do we do this without being Ebenezer Scrooge or living in a commune? Continue reading